Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Shogun Tsunayoshi (dog shogun)

Shogun Tsunayoshi (dog shogun) 3 years 11 months ago #766

  • KariAnn
  • KariAnn's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Новый участник
  • Posts: 10
  • Karma: 0
Follower the Shintoism, this Japanese ruler is well-known because of creation the Edicts on Compassion for Living Things, which is the first and the eldest official law concerning animals, such as dogs, cats and old horses. Later, this list was completed by cows, chickens, turtles, snakes and fish, selling of which was banned. For this reason, Tsunayoshi earned the pejorative title “Inu-Kubō” (dog shogun).

Deciding to change his bad luck with the birth of his successor, Tsunayoshi provided serious penalties up to execution for everybody killing any animal, and first of all - dogs. Moreover, dogs became to have more rights than the people. For example, farmers had no right to use any force to make dogs which were distorting fields with rice to leave, except using polite requests even without making the voice loud. Population of one village was executed after violation of this rule. First in the history of world, dogs were housed to kennels in the suburbs of the city. The dogs there enjoyed their meal such as rise and meat three times per day while the farmers had it almost double fewer. Dog’s meal was at the expense of the taxpaying citizens of Edo. Also, in his castle Tsunayoshi hadn’t a single dog.

Shogun was some inadequate with his laws concerning dogs. But is there any other historical example like that?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Shogun Tsunayoshi (dog shogun) 3 years 4 months ago #2400

  • arianna
  • arianna's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Новый участник
  • Posts: 14
  • Thank you received: 4
  • Karma: 0
Thank you a lot for the information, it was very cognitive and useful.
I would ad some information regarding Shogun Tsunayoshi.

Based on a imperious re-examination of the basic sources, this spectacular new work by a senior scholar of the Tokugawa date support that Tsunayoshi’s proeminence occure much more from the work of samurai historians and formal who saw their honors invocated by a header retaliatory to simple people. Beatrice Bodart-Bailey’s insightful analysis of Tsunayoshi’s fond hangar new light on his identity and the policies bounded with his shogunate. Tsunayoshi was the 4th son of Tokugawa Iemitsu (1604–1651) and left largely in the solicitude of his mother, the daughter of a greengrocer. Under her influence, Bodart-Bailey dispute, the future ruler rioted against the appreciation of his class.
As a proof she refered to the fact that, as shogun, Tsunayoshi not only ordered the registration of dogs, which were a huge number kept by samurai and postured a danger to the masses, but also the registration of pregnant women and young children to avert filicide.

In his slanderer eyes, Tsunayoshi’s concern in Confucian and Buddhist studies and his other intellectual chase were merely distractions for a amateur. Bodart-Bailey counters that view by pointing out that one of Japan’s most important political philosophers, Ogyû Sorai, trained to craft under the fifth shogun. Sorai not only complimented Tsunayoshi’s government, but his writings formed the theoretical framework for many of the ruler’s disputable policies. Another salutary facet of Tsunayoshi’s guide that Bodart-Bailey brings to light is his character in anticipating the hunger and the revolt that would have certainly taken place following the most badly earthquake and tsunami as well as the most forcible eruption of Mount Fuji in history—all of which happened to be during the final years of Tsunayoshi's shogunate.

The Dog Shogun is a thoroughly reviewers work of Japanese political history that affects on many social, intellectual, and economic evolution as well. As such it pledged to become a standard text on late-seventeenth and early-eighteenth-century Japan.
мы рождены чтобы любить
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Powered by Kunena Forum